All About the Speechwriter Behind Michelle Obama’s Rousing DNC Address



First Lady Michelle Obama’s speech brought a divided Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton crowd together last night after she spoke out against Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump without ever saying his name, addressing the Democratic National Convention forcefully and personally.

While Michelle Obama plays a significant role in writing her own speeches, the White House acknowledged that she did receive some help from Sarah Hurwitz, a speechwriter who previously worked for Hillary Clinton and who even wrote the speech that Melania Trump was accused of plagiarizing at the RNC just a week earlier.

Here’s everything you need to know about Hurwitz:

Who Is She?

Sarah Hurwitz currently serves, according to the White House, as senior advisor to the White House Council on Women and Girls.

She also serves as senior presidential speechwriter, according to her bio on The Truman National Security Project. Prior to working for the first lady and president, Hurwitz served as a speechwriter for Clinton, Gen. Wesley Clark, Sen. John Kerry, and Sen. Tom Harkin.

Like her boss, Hurwitz is a Harvard graduate, receiving her law degree from the school as well.

What’s She Written Before?

Hurwitz was the writer behind the Clinton’s concession speech in 2008, which is best known for the line in which she said her supporters made “18 million cracks” in the glass ceiling.

According to the Washington Post, Hurwitz is “one of the few remaining staff members who joined the White House straight from the 2008 campaign. She started that cycle, though, as Hillary Clinton’s chief speechwriter. Two days after Clinton conceded defeat with a memorable speech hailing ’18 million cracks’ in the ‘highest, hardest glass ceiling,’ the Obama team called to offer Hurwitz a job.”

Hurwitz then went on to write Michelle Obama’s 2008 convention speech, the one Melania Trump is accused of lifting lines from for her own convention speech.

How Did Michelle Obama’s DNC Speech Come Together?

The New York Times reports that Monday night’s speech went through several drafts.

“They met in the first lady’s East Wing office with other top aides to go over Mrs. Obama’s edits, handwritten in the margins of the drafts or sent to the group in an email,” the New York Times reported.

The powerful speech became one of the top three most mentioned moments from the convention Monday.

And, after President Obama tweeted his congrats, his heartfelt praise became most re-tweeted tweet of the day, with 120,000-plus sharing his words.

The DNC runs through Thursday.

Categories: National News, Politics