Celebrating Black History Month: Darius Rucker

Tyler Ryan shares details about South Carolina's Darius Rucker celebrating Black History Month

 

Country Music Superstar Darius Rucker was born in Charleston, South Carolina on May 13th 1966.      

Rucker first gained fame as founder and lead singer of Hootie and the Blowfish, a group he formed while attending the University of South Carolina.  Hootie and the Blowfish proved to be a huge success with five studio albums and six top 40 hits on the Billboard Hot 100.   

In 2002, Rucker a solo album, followed by a transition into Country Music the same year.  This move would not only prove hugely successful for Rucker, with hits such as Wagon Wheel and True Believers, but change the course of Country music history, as he  became the first black American singer to win the Country Music Associations New Artist Award.   

While Rucker has had huge success in his musical career across different music genres, he is a generous philanthropist.  Rucker has regularly worked with charities that support sick and underprivileged children, via benefit concerts, volunteering, the World Golf Foundation’s The First Tee Program.  The Hootie & The Blowfish Foundation has raised nearly $4.5 million to provide funding to public education systems throughout South Carolina.  He also currently serves as a board member of the MUSC Children’s Hospital in Charleston.

For more, check out www.abccolumbia.com/blackhistory.

 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Tyler Ryan is an award winning television and radio personality, writer, investigative journalist, and professional emcee.  He appears daily on ABC Columbia’s Good Morning Columbia, as well as hosting the syndicated radio program Carolina Cares on the South Carolina Radio Network, and the iHeart Radio Network.  Tyler also regularly appears as a criminal expert and journalist on regional and national crime based programs like Snapped and Killer Couples.  You can contact him directly via EMAIL Or on the socials: Tyler’s Instagram  // Tyler’s Facebook

 

Categories: Black History