2 tornadoes confirmed, no storm-related deaths following Dorian in S.C.

As Dorian continues to make its way up the South Carolina coast, officials are responding as best they can to the areas that have been hit.

 

Columbia, S.C. (WOLO) — As Dorian continues to make its way up the South Carolina coast, officials are responding as best they can to the areas that have been hit. So far, no storm-related deaths have been reported in the state.

There are more than 2,000 people staying in 33 shelters open statewide, and more than 200,000 power outages across the state. The mandatory evacuation order has been lifted in 3 out of the 8 it was initially issued in. The order has been lifted in Jasper, Beaufort and Colleton counties, but still remains in the other 5.

“All coastal counties are reporting power outages, blocked roads and localized flooding,” said Kim Stenson, Director of the South Carolina Emergency Management Division.

Hurricane Dorian has not made landfall in South Carolina, but the state is still seeing impacts from the storm.

“So far, as far as we know, we’ve had no storm-related deaths and we want to keep it that way.  Cause we rebuild buildings, but you can’t start a life all over again. So we want the people to be careful, that’s why we’re here,” said Gov. Henry McMaster.

Two tornadoes were confirmed to have touched down, in Little River and North Myrtle Beach.

“Just some houses damaged, I think some roofs damaged. The problem up there right now we still got tropical storm-force winds up there, and getting out and looking at those things so we don’t have complete information right now,” said Stenson.

Thousands are still without power, and authorities have asked citizens to please stay indoors until the storm has passed.

“We want to remind the motoring public, roadway conditions will be dangerous in the impacted areas. Please stay off the roads unless it’s absolutely necessary,” said Leroy Smith, Director of the South Carolina Department of Public Service.

Even after the rain has stopped, there will still be recovery work and damages to repair.

“When the wind stops, we still have to deal with the water. Cause the water will last longer. And once the water is gone, we have to get in and try to evaluate, we still have downed power lines and all kinds of other danger,” said McMaster.

Utility crews are out repairing strom damage to power lines when it’s safe for them to be out, if winds are over 35 mph they have to wait for the storm to die down.

On Friday, SCEMD officials say counties will be able to do more damage assessment to see how Dorian impacted the state.

FEMA is on-site, and officers say they’re ready to assist if needed.

Categories: Local News, News, State