People could register to vote at day 4 of Columbia protests

Tuesday brought another day of protests in downtown Columbia, as people continue to honor George Floyd and other unarmed African Americans who have been recently killed.

Columbia, S.C. (WOLO) — Tuesday brought another day of protests in downtown Columbia, as people continue to honor George Floyd and other unarmed African Americans who have been recently killed.

Day four of protests brought even more peace, as protesters once again took to the State House.

“We’re here all just to say that enough is enough. We have to do something, we have to fight, we have to make sure that this does not continue. That’s why I’m here,” said Daniel Farquharson, who attended the protest.

Community members came out to show support by bringing water, ice and snacks. There were also people who volunteered to be medics.

“People out here that are volunteer medics. They bring their first-aid packs, and things of that nature, in case there’s any injuries. They have everything in those backpacks, and so we’re seeing even more of that today,” said Danielle Ford, who was also in attendance.

On Tuesday, protesters could even register to vote.

“We have people out here that are registering people to vote, and I just think that’s so priceless,” said Ford.

“I believe it’s my civil duty. I am an Eagle Scout, I am a resident of Columbia, South Carolina, and I feel like I need to be out here making a difference,” said Garrison Thomas, who was one those registering people.

Protesters say they want change without any of the violence that’s been seen in previous days.

“Do my very best to make sure that we can have a peaceful protest and a successful protest, without all the negative, without the looting, without the burning of cars, without the destruction of property. And still get our voices heard and make sure we bring about change,” said Ford.

“We have people honk in support, we have people who flip us off driving by as well. Nothing violent has been done because we’re here peacefully. We’re here to spread our message that what happened was wrong and we cannot allow it,” said Farquharson.

One way to ensure change, is to get to the polls.

“Obviously people are angry, and they lash out sometimes. But I feel as if I can create a lasting change if people are registered to vote,” said Thomas.

Categories: Local News, News, State